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Thread: Pumping water out of a cone

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  1. #1

    Pumping water out of a cone

    A tank has the shape of an inverted circular cone (point at the bottom) with height 10 feet and radius 4 feet. The tank is full of water. We pump out water (to a pipe at the top of the tank) until the water level is 5 feet from the bottom. The work W required to do this is given by? I have nowhere left to turn :/ NO SHAME

  2. #2
    Well let's look at the variables
    :fors: 3 seconds
    4x
    1100 meters
    :Portalkey: 1200 meters

    So basically,
    It takes devourer 2 seconds to devour a tank of water, and forsaken archer 3 seconds to open enough holes so that the water escapes, while Blacksmith only takes .23 seconds

  3. #3

  4. #4
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    Ooh fun, this thread is for me! Future math and physics teacher here to help. Well, my teacher instinct is telling me not to just give it away, so let me aim you in the right direction with another question (aren't teachers just awesome?)

    What's the potential energy of the water you wish to displace?

    PM me if you still need help.
    Last edited by NuneShelping; 09-09-2010 at 12:54 AM.
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  5. #5
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    W = F x d

    d = 5 ft (convert to SI)
    F = weight of water x 9.8 (are we pumping it down?)

    Find the weight by converting it into area. Remember water has specific gravity of 1 and therefore will be equal to area^3.

    By the by, I barely passed college physics. If you need help with biochem, I am your man.

  6. #6
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    Oh god I'll probably have problems like this in 2 weeks time...

    I thought work only applied to upwards force? My last physics class jumped ship and pushing a 10 pound weight up a 45 degree slope lol. I would suggest using calculus to make some shortcut by integrating the inverse formula of the inverse of... I dunno haha

  7. #7
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    And people still thinks HoN community sucks.


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    I'm going to go out on limb here and say 4.

  9. #9
    well, judging by my knowledge of everything in the universe, and the pure win i piss out every morning, i'd say the answer you're looking for 42
    Quote Originally Posted by NomesWisdom View Post
    even tho ur str u can smart which u aren't

  10. #10
    Well this thread is new.

  11. #11
    here ya go. http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y1/...dalus/math.jpg

    This is a very similar problem. you will merely need to change the numbers, remove the extra 5ft that is h2, and account for only pumping the top 5 ft.

    Hope it ain't to late :P


    -this is not my work.

    EDIT:
    simplified

    W = (Force)*(distance)

    W = (mass)*(acceleration)*(distance)

    W= (pi)(r^2)(10ft-h)(1000kg/m^3)*(gravity)*(dh)
    //h is the height of the slice -it is the variable
    //r = 2/5h (relationship of cone height to radius) - this allows us to use only one variable, h
    //1000kg/m^3 is the density of water. This multiplied by the volume will give the total mass
    //dh is the change in height

    Fill in all the numbers, convert to SI units, simplify, integrate from 1.524m(5ft)-3.048m(10ft)

    Im rusty, but makes sense to me :P GL
    Last edited by RyHon; 09-09-2010 at 04:06 AM.

  12. #12
    double post.

  13. #13
    id say tis feckin broke anyway

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